Blog Interior Scholarship

Naomi Rossignol

Interior Scholarship – das AIT-Stipendium der Sto-Stiftung

March- May 2018

“Your imagination is the only limit”

In the beginning of February, I had the opportunity to work with ceramic within an architectural application. We were commissioned at school to design a pavilion for the garden of the world-famous clown Slava Polunin. Fascinated by the magical world of this artist, I imagined large scale meteorites that would land in his garden and in which we could rest.

I was inspired by gems, stones, the vivid colours of dragonflies and by meteorites themselves. As part of the research process, I visited the exhibitions “Meteorites, between sky and earth” in Paris and the Museum für Naturkunde in Berlin which brought me information and inspiration to develop my concept. First theoretically, how the meteorites are formed, what their composition is, where do they come from, how do they reach planet earth? Secondly physically, what are they shapes, colours and textures.

Working with clay and glazes helped me translate this organic universe and develop my own language quite easily. Intuitively, I started to shape 1:20, 1:10 meteorite-models using black clay and applying a layer of glaze before firing to bring colours. Within this process, I particularly liked working with fire. Putting my meteorite-models in a kiln for more than 72h at 1040° C gave another dimension to the making process. For the first time, I was not in control of the final look/appearance of my design.
Technically, I was inspired by the work of Assemble studio with their projects Structures of Landscape and The truffle for their use of metal structure and method of construction. Parallelly, I studied fire method such as raku and wood kiln to consider a giant combustion that would cook the meteorite. Finally, based on this research I developed 2 scenarios for a possible 1:1 realisation.

Alongside this, I made a lot of sketches of the meteorites with charcoal to feel and embody the energy and character of it. Among them, a 1:1 drawing which appeared to be a real physical experience. Implicating wide movement, it became a spontaneous choreography which a friend helped me catch with his camera. Additionally, and to bring some context and narration, I photographed the meteorites in an outside environment and in motion.

The project was presented in Paris, end of Mars, to the client Slava the clown and his team.
Even if the project may stay at a conceptual and at experimental stage, I found a profound connection working with ceramics and hope to continue working with this authentic technique in further projects.

Alle Blog-Einträge von Naomi Rossignol

Naomi Rossignol

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2019
Blogger Naomi Rossignol

I started my research looking at the flower fields of Hillegom, one of the most typical flat Dutch landscapes. Tulip cultivation areas surrounded by water canals. My first impression was that the place was rather quite. Moreover, I could see a real confrontation between the man-made land and the natural fauna and flora to maintain. I wondered how the farmers are sustaining their field, and what is the influence of the surrounding environment? To go deeper, I specifically decided to focus on the human, tulips and snails. Thus, I went on collecting a lot of information on-site and online and started to compare the three by making graphics. What is their lifespan, adult size in centimeters, rate of growth in cm/day, speed of movement in km/h, for instance? It appeared to me that these were the invisible layers that are shaping the landscape.

Naomi Rossignol

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2019
Blogger Naomi Rossignol

Of all the professional experiences I had this year, the most intense adventure was participating in the Climathon. This worldwide 24-hour competition, located in “The Green Village” of the Technical University of Delft and organized by Climate-KIC, revolved around finding solutions for the climate. Motivated students, professionals and teachers, coming from various backgrounds, gathered to find solutions for the future. This year, the Netherlands, one participants among more than 100 other countries, had the task to work on the theme of Energy. Teams were formed and assigned specific existing spaces. Thus, I ended up working in a team all night long, finding and developing smart energy efficiency solutions for the Aula conference building located on the TU Delft campus, designed by the Dutch team Van Den Broek and Bakema in the style of brutalist architecture. During these 24 hours, all our energy went into analysing, exchanging, drawing, erasing, modelling, writing… – along the way, being coached by professionals and teachers – to finally present our project in front of a high-level expert jury. The 5 projects developed by the 40 participants were very diverse and promising.