Stipendiaten-Blog: Naomi Rossignol

In Partnerschaft mit der Sto-Stiftung

Of all the professional experiences I had this year, the most intense adventure was participating in the Climathon. This worldwide 24-hour competition, located in “The Green Village” of the Technical University of Delft and organized by Climate-KIC, revolved around finding solutions for the climate. Motivated students, professionals and teachers, coming from various backgrounds, gathered to find solutions for the future. This year, the Netherlands, one participants among more than 100 other countries, had the task to work on the theme of Energy. Teams were formed and assigned specific existing spaces. Thus, I ended up working in a team all night long, finding and developing smart energy efficiency solutions for the Aula conference building located on the TU Delft campus, designed by the Dutch team Van Den Broek and Bakema in the style of brutalist architecture. During these 24 hours, all our energy went into analysing, exchanging, drawing, erasing, modelling, writing… – along the way, being coached by professionals and teachers – to finally present our project in front of a high-level expert jury. The 5 projects developed by the 40 participants were very diverse and promising. My team ended up winning the competition with our project NICHE (Non-Invasive Central Heat Exchange)! The next step is to pitch the project on upcoming events in January and to get help from professors of the Technical University of Delft to further develop the project. What made the competition so special was the fact that we had to race against time. This had a direct influence on our working method. We divided the tasks and assigned parts to team members based on each person’s competence and communication efficiency. We had to be clear and critical in the process and eventually be convincing and stay sharp during the final 3-minute presentation.

Academy Royal of Art, Den Haag
The Duke Elligton ‚Nutcracker Suite‘ project
Beginning of September, the school commissioned us to design the scenography for the Nutcracker Suite that would be enacted by the Royal Conservatory in The Hague at the end of December. This was to be a Jazz version of the famous ballet originally composed by Tchaikovsky, that would bring together musicians, dancers, costumes, decors, light, and projections… A real challenge in terms of coordination. Thus, as a crossover of disciplines, the French choreographer Karine Guizzo came to the school one day to see our design process and be able to start thinking of a possible choreography which would illustrate the
story of the Nutcracker. Meeting her happened to be an unexpected moment because we both realized that we knew each other
from the time I was studying at the dance conservatory in Annecy, France. It was such a surprise and after some exchange, she asks me if I would be willing to be one of the dancers. I did not have to think about it twice. Of course, I was entrapped. Enthusiastic, I was back in the dance studios after a 4-year break. Few hours per day, we started exploring how forms and movements arose from objects and bodies, how it is possible to shape body movements into sculptural position and composition.
Most of the time, we were working on improvisation with music to let the body speak for itself. It was difficult at first, not to improvise, but to lose the ballet technique my body still remembered. In the same way as we cannot unlearn riding a bike, it sticks to you forever.

French sociologist Marcel Mauss used to say that “everything in us is under command”. This is how I felt at that moment. I was locked in the technique I had learnt. This is how, as a reaction to it, I naturally started working with my eyes closed. This became a tool to help me reconnect with the space inside me, be more attentive to the notion of weight, more sensitive with the
contact of the ground, and finally find a language of movement suiting the music. We also focused on how the body moves along the scene in correlation with the musicians and the decor. In the process, the Russian costume had also played an important role. The idea was to create a kind of architectural body with different pieces that would come together, an assembling of objects decorated with Russian graphic design patterns from the 1930s. The interesting part in the costume making was that we were creating the forms, objects, costumes, and the choreography simultaneously, shaping one according to the other and vice versa. For instance, in the dance studio, these objects were restricting my movements but also offered me new possibilities. A kind of new extension of my body that had an influence on my balance, speed, visibility, spatial projection, and interaction with my partner, the other dancer. In the end, the performance was a real success and the choreographer asked me to dance again twice, for different productions at the end of December. Finally, I noticed that I can no longer dissociate movement from my identity. Working with my body has become a way to explore myself, a tool for me to design space and forms. This assignment has been a unique chance to connect with my background, and I want to continue in this direction. For this reason, I will soon be attending a workshop about movement and objects in space in Berlin. More than ever I feel the urge to continue exploring surface, body and space.


Weitere Stipendium-News

#WirvsVirus – Janna Radlow, Stipendiatin 2019/2020

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2020
Blogger Janna Radlow

Gerade steht alles Kopf. Seit drei Wochen befindet sich unsere Gesellschaft nun schon in einem Ausnahmezustand. Wir sind dazu aufgerufen, zu Hause zu bleiben, den Kontakt zu Freunden und Arbeitskollegen zu vermeiden, einfach abzuwarten, um uns selbst und die Risikogruppe zu schützen.

Compound Voids – Karolin Kull, Stipendiatin 2019/2020

Blog Interior Scholarship
März 2020
Blogger Karolin Kull

The semester has begun in a new environment, in Rhode Island School of Design. One course I take conducts an investigation on human factors, by syllabus “The relationship between the bodies and senses and space in the context of architecture and interior design”. We go to explore how human interaction influences the space by choosing two activities, one for individual and one for collective, and combine them into one monolithic dual artifact. Working with a sketchbook – something that I do a lot – became my personal point of research and socializing became the collective one.

Blowing Glass – Lara Grandchamp, Stipendiatin 2019/2020

Blog Interior Scholarship
März 2020
Blogger Lara Grandchamp

This term, my group of study is giving a closer look at the eclectic collections of objects gathered over the years by the The Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH). The Swiss TPH was founded in 1943 by the famous Basler zoologist Dr Rudolf Geigy[1]. Over the years, Dr Geigy and his fellow scientists colleagues have brought back different objects and art pieces from the countries they have stayed in mainly western Africa. These objects have since taken random placed in the TPH’s building, with no particular care in terms of display setup. It was rather amusing to see wooden mask and spires casually hanged beside the printer and the bathroom door!

Startup-Airplace – Alfiia Koneeva, Stipendiatin 2019/20

Blog Interior Scholarship
Februar 2020
Blogger Alfiia Koneeva

Ein Eigentümer denkt darüber nach, seine Flächen und Gebäude in unmittelbarer Nähe zu Flughafen, Bahnhof, Autobahn sowie den Innenstädten Halle und Leipzig in eine Kulturstiftung einzubringen. Mit Blick darauf soll die 10.000 Quadratmeter große Dachfläche des MMC Mitteldeutsches Mode Center, in dem 240 B2B-Showrooms dem Einzelhandel Kleidung anbieten, nachverdichtet werden. Die Zielgruppe dafür definiert sich aus Existenzgründern aus Design, Innenarchitektur und Medien. Dabei stellt sich die Frage: Was braucht die Gründerszene der Kreativwirtschaft wirklich? Ich beschäftigte mich sehr lange mit diesem Text, den ich gleich drei Mal lesen musste um ihn auch nur annähernd verstehen zu können. Doch das Thema, über das ich zugegebener Maßen vorher nie wirklich nachgedacht hatte, lies mich nicht mehr los. Eine Frage nach der anderen stellte sich mir, Bilder von Aussichtstürmen, Gipfelkreuzen, verwirrten Menschen mit Stadtkarten in der Hand, sowie von alten Gemälden aus der „Position Gottes“,… entstanden in meinem Kopf. Eine solch intensive Auseinandersetzung mit einem Text, immer mit dem Gedanken an eine räumliche Interpretation, war für mich eine völlig neue Herausforderung. Jedoch eine super spannende Erfahrung!

Schöne Platte – Janna Radlow, Stipendiatin 2019/2020

Blog Interior Scholarship
Dezember 2019
Blogger Janna Radlow

Ich wohne im Moment in Halle an der Saale. Eine Stadt die durch ihre gut erhaltenden Altbauviertel eine echte kleine Schönheit ist. Doch es gibt eben noch einen oben beschriebenen, komplett anderen Stadtteil auf der gegenüberliegenden Flussseite, der meist eher mit Begriffen wie „grau und hässlich“ beschimpft wird. Es handelt sich um den Stadtteil Halle-Neustadt, „Ha-Neu“.

Bodies, senses and artifacts

Blog Interior Scholarship
November 2019
Blogger Karolin Kull

The semester has begun in a new environment, in Rhode Island School of Design. One course I take conducts an investigation on human factors, by syllabus “The relationship between the bodies and senses and space in the context of architecture and interior design”. We go to explore how human interaction influences the space by choosing two activities, one for individual and one for collective, and combine them into one monolithic dual artifact. Working with a sketchbook – something that I do a lot – became my personal point of research and socializing became the collective one.

Lara Grandchamp

Blog Interior Scholarship
November 2019
Blogger Lara Grandchamp

This term, my group of study is giving a closer look at the eclectic collections of objects gathered over the years by the The Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH). The Swiss TPH was founded in 1943 by the famous Basler zoologist Dr Rudolf Geigy[1]. Over the years, Dr Geigy and his fellow scientists colleagues have brought back different objects and art pieces from the countries they have stayed in mainly western Africa. These objects have since taken random placed in the TPH’s building, with no particular care in terms of display setup. It was rather amusing to see wooden mask and spires casually hanged beside the printer and the bathroom door!

Carlijn Olde Beverborg

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2019
Blogger Carlijn Olde Beverborg

Zwei Jahre nach meinem Bachelorabschluss in Architektur und Stadtplanung an der Universität Stuttgart, habe ich im September 2017 den Master in Spatial Design an der Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts in Kopenhagen begonnen. Die Möglichkeit sich als Design-, Innenarchitektur- oder Architekturabsolvent für diesen Master zu bewerben, schafft ein interessantes Fundament für zukünftige Kollaborationen zwischen Studenten mit unterschiedlichen Herkünften und Hintergründen. Das Bestreben des Programms voneinander zu lernen, zu kollaborieren und von den unterschiedlichen Hintergründen zu profitieren, wurde nach den ersten Veranstaltungen deutlich und ist nach wie vor der rote Faden, der sich bis heute durch das Programm zieht.

Juliane Glaser

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2019
Blogger Juliane Glaser

In „Kunst des Handelns“ stellt Michel Certeau die von einem Einzelnen oder einer Minderheit geplante Stadt als einen klaren, leicht lesbaren Text dar. Doch von einem Architekten oder Stadtplaner entworfen, ist die geplante Stadt reine Fiktion. In sie dringt die bewohnte, wandelnde Stadt mit ihrer undurchschaubaren, blinden Beweglichkeit. Ich beschäftigte mich sehr lange mit diesem Text, den ich gleich drei Mal lesen musste um ihn auch nur annähernd verstehen zu können. Doch das Thema, über das ich zugegebener Maßen vorher nie wirklich nachgedacht hatte, lies mich nicht mehr los. Eine Frage nach der anderen stellte sich mir, Bilder von Aussichtstürmen, Gipfelkreuzen, verwirrten Menschen mit Stadtkarten in der Hand, sowie von alten Gemälden aus der „Position Gottes“,… entstanden in meinem Kopf. Eine solch intensive Auseinandersetzung mit einem Text, immer mit dem Gedanken an eine räumliche Interpretation, war für mich eine völlig neue Herausforderung. Jedoch eine super spannende Erfahrung!

Bastian Feltgen

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2019
Blogger Bastian Feltgen

Die Zeit vergeht gefühlt wie im Flug – und auf einmal ist 2018. Ein paar Tage nach meinem vorherigen Blogeintrag hatten wir unsere letzte Zwischenpräsentation und wieder einmal waren wir größtenteils damit beschäftigt, die Arbeit der letzten Monate zusammenzustellen und präsentationsfähig zu machen. Es ist interessant zu sehen wie unproduktiv man sich fühlt, wenn man immer wieder aufgehalten wird, um Ideen und gesammelte Informationen für den Moment zu präsentieren. Nichtsdestotrotz lief die Präsentation gut und wenn ich drüber nachdenke, war es vielleicht gar nicht so schlecht, die Arbeit der letzten Monate noch mal zusammenzufassen. Die nach der Präsentation aufkeimende Entwurfs-Euphorie wurde jedoch durch einen im Semesterplan integrierten Workshop unterbrochen. Wie im letzten Blogeintrag erwähnt, bearbeiten wir eine semesterübergreifende Entwurfsaufgabe, die von drei fünftägigen Workshops mit den Themen Tektonik, Geschichte und Anthropologie begleitet wird. Nachdem wir in den vergangenen Monaten die Workshops in Geschichte und Anthropologie absolviert hatten, wartete nun der Tektonik Workshop auf uns. Im folgenden Beitrag möchte ich etwas detaillierter auf diesen Workshop eingehen und einen kleinen Einblick in die dort gemachten Erfahrungen geben.

Naomi Rossignol

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2019
Blogger Naomi Rossignol

I started my research looking at the flower fields of Hillegom, one of the most typical flat Dutch landscapes. Tulip cultivation areas surrounded by water canals. My first impression was that the place was rather quite. Moreover, I could see a real confrontation between the man-made land and the natural fauna and flora to maintain. I wondered how the farmers are sustaining their field, and what is the influence of the surrounding environment? To go deeper, I specifically decided to focus on the human, tulips and snails. Thus, I went on collecting a lot of information on-site and online and started to compare the three by making graphics. What is their lifespan, adult size in centimeters, rate of growth in cm/day, speed of movement in km/h, for instance? It appeared to me that these were the invisible layers that are shaping the landscape.

Naomi Rossignol

Blog Interior Scholarship
April 2019
Blogger Naomi Rossignol

Of all the professional experiences I had this year, the most intense adventure was participating in the Climathon. This worldwide 24-hour competition, located in “The Green Village” of the Technical University of Delft and organized by Climate-KIC, revolved around finding solutions for the climate. Motivated students, professionals and teachers, coming from various backgrounds, gathered to find solutions for the future. This year, the Netherlands, one participants among more than 100 other countries, had the task to work on the theme of Energy. Teams were formed and assigned specific existing spaces. Thus, I ended up working in a team all night long, finding and developing smart energy efficiency solutions for the Aula conference building located on the TU Delft campus, designed by the Dutch team Van Den Broek and Bakema in the style of brutalist architecture. During these 24 hours, all our energy went into analysing, exchanging, drawing, erasing, modelling, writing… – along the way, being coached by professionals and teachers – to finally present our project in front of a high-level expert jury. The 5 projects developed by the 40 participants were very diverse and promising.

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