AIT Ausgaben

Issue 09 | 2018

Issue 09 | 2018

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Dear Readers,

Shopping is one of the favourite pastimes of the Germans – according to a study by the Chamber of Industry and Commerce, which conducted an analysis of the Stuttgart region in August. According to the study, 21 billion euros flow into the retail sector every year – that is, with an average of 7,569 euros per inhabitant, slightly more than the national average of 6,924 euros. Retailers should be pleased about this, one might think, but they are
already concerned about the sales of 3.7 billion euros that the regional online and mail order trade has recorded. Pure figures, the fruit farmer from Lake Constance would mumble, shrugging his shoulders, where the hot summer ensures perfectly filled shelves (picture at the top) at the roadside. Thankfully, they still exist – the small sales stands, which can offer with the smallest means what the secret of success and unique selling point of the retail trade is: customer-oriented supply, authenticity and a shopping experience for all senses. Applied to the large scale, this recipe works at best also for supermarkets that – especially in Germany – have successfully broken away from the “cheap is cool” principle. The supermarket in the Zeisehalle in Hamburg (p. 120) is a particularly successful example of this. And how a small Greek family business has developed into a supermarket of superlatives in more than 140 years and four generations with persistent quality awareness and a good feeling for customer preferences is shown from page 112 onwards. With the article by Thomas Frey “Shopfitting 4.0” (p. 138) we dare to take a look into the future and ask “What influence does increasing digitalization have on shopfitting?” The cover of
our current magazine is adorned with a photographic artwork by our former AIT intern Laura Zalenga, whom we interviewed for the Change of Perspective section (p. 48). We found that the motif makes a particularly successful reference to the topic of “presentation” and refers with a wink to our product focus on wallpapers and wall paints (p. 76). Or would you have preferred one from the design-conscious truck drivers (p. 8, 32, 58)?

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 07/08 | 2018

Issue 07/08 | 2018

Living

Dear Readers,

When it comes to housing, the main issue at the moment is shortage. Politics and the construction industry are fully committed to meeting this challenge. For architects and interior designers, it goes without saying that solutions must be found to meet these demands. The list of ideas is as varied as the requirements and the budgets: from Tiny Houses solutions to multi-storey apartment buildings and conversions to new and old buildings as well as annexes. We have collected a wealth of remarkable examples for this housing issue that do not look like shortage at all. The concept of transforming vacant office space
into attractive living space has already been implemented in various major German cities. Our author Rainer Müller has looked at a few of them and warmly recommends this effective form of conversion (p. 128). Subsequent densification is particularly appropriate wherever gaps in the urban space remain unused for years. How these can be filled is impressively demonstrated by a supplementary new building in London (p. 106), which only at second glance is not a reconstruction of the existing building, and by the conversion of an old metalworking shop in Stuttgart—or what was left of it—into two extremely comfortable
residential units (p. 142). And because shortage management is not our main concern anyway, we also show unusual living situations, not exactly inexpensive, but all the more inspiring—like the show apartment in Shanghai (p. 100) or Penthouse F in Vienna (p. 112). My visit to Villa Lemke in Berlin’s Alt-Hohenschönhausen district was also extremely inspiring (picture above). The last house designed by Mies van der Rohe in Germany before his emigration to the USA in 1938 was built in the Bauhaus style in the early 1930s and has served as an exhibition pavilion for modern art since 2002. And if you are planning a visit to the Architecture Biennale by November, don’t miss the opportunity to visit the island of San Giorgio Maggiore to see the Vatican’s first Biennale contribution (p. 11). If you can’t walk anymore, you will be helped (picture below). We wish you a sunny summer!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Ausgabe 03 | 2018

Ausgabe 03 | 2018

LIVING

Dear Readers,

For us, spring is every year dominated by a large number of trade fair visits. In the first few weeks of the year, one invitation after the other has probably arrived on your desk or in your e-mail inbox, too. In retrospect, however, one thing is for sure: So many direct contacts with friends, colleagues and business partners are only possible during an active trade fair visit, not to mention three-dimensional experiences on and around welldesigned trade fair stands – like at the Quadroskop (picture left) by Schmidhuber from Munich for Carpet Concept on the occasion of the Domotex trade fair! It goes without saying that we have returned home packed full of information about fair novelties to filter and process them for you. In this AIT issue you will find our furniture highlights
from imm cologne starting on page 28, everything about carpet innovations presented at Domotex starts on page 66 and textile discoveries from Heimtextil are featured from page 72 onwards. When selecting projects for the topic our current issue, Living, we once again found that there is an incredible number of outstanding examples for this. Whether it’s new buildings, conversions or extensions in Ljubljana, Turin, Zurich, Berlin, Stuttgart or Stockholm – the respectful and skilful use of materials and colours, the intelligent ideas for space-saving housing or careful considerations for the renovation of
historical monuments were the decisive factors for our selection (from page 84 on). The fact that Stuttgart is so strongly represented in this context surprised us only briefly, as we personally experience the density of construction sites in the capital of the “Häuslebauer” (home builders) every day on our way to the editorial office. In our new “Photo and Space” series (p. 130), we highlight completely different forms of living and show utopian examples from the 1960s and 1970s, photographed by Johanna Diehl. Of course, our columnists Dominik and Benjamin Reding have come up with something quite extraordinary (p. 56) on the subject of living – as always brilliant, but read for yourself!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 06 | 2018

Issue 06 | 2018

BAR HOTEL RESTAURANT

Dear Readers,

we won!!! The German trade press has awarded AIT the title of best trade magazine 2018! On the next two pages we will tell you why we have been honoured for the 4th time and how we celebrated this occasion. Inspired by this news, we dedicated ourselves to the topic of our current issue, Bar Hotel Restaurant, to work through our impressions gathered at the Salone del Mobile in Milan (from page 32; on the left: “The Diner” installation by David Rockwell at Ventura Centrale). We not only took a closer look at the gastronomic projects, but also slept, bathed, ate there and – in the end – wrote about it. We visited St. Moritz, Büsum, Imst, Hamburg, Vienna, Offenburg, Stuttgart, Pontresina (picture below), and Amsterdam and have brought back first-hand information and impressions, which we have turned into an exciting mix of reports on remarkable bars, hotels, and restaurants (from page 84) for this issue. The first sunny days had an inspiring effect on the composition of the large special outdoor section (page 74). For the start of the summer season, we are presenting deckchairs, chairs, umbrellas, and luminaires for outdoors use in restaurants and cafés. Three very different representatives of our interior design/architectural profession are the focus of our series Mrs. Architect, Change of Perspective, and Apprenticeship at… Margarete Schütte-Lihotzky was much more than “just” the inventor of Frankfurt cuisine and has achieved astonishing things in her 103 years of life (page 52). Few interior designers are known from radio and television – but Eva Brenner can claim exactly that. Since studying interior design, she has been presenting television programmes and has told us about her work in front of the camera (page 56). Marie Menninger, an architecture student, is still at the very beginning of her career. One of her stations is an internship abroad at Kubota Bachmann in Paris (from page 60). Towards our editorial deadline, we had a very special experience in the “Ellington” in Berlin. On May 16th, we received the trophy for the best trade magazine 2018!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 01/02 | 2018

Issue 01/02 | 2018

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Dear Readers,

Have you had a good start to the New Year? We hope so! For us it has started very dynamically: after four years we thought it was appropriate to refresh both the layout of AIT and its contents. And today, the first AIT issue in 2018 lies in front of you – with a modified, lighter graphic, larger images and additional contents. One of the new series is called “Mrs. Architect” (starting on p. 32) – does it sound familiar? Of course, we were not only inspired by the exhibition at the Deutsches Architekturmuseum (picture left and p. 22), we were even allowed to draw from the DAM curators’ archive and show you a personal and work history of our respected colleagues in each of the coming AIT issues. In the new series “Living in Icons” (from p. 36 on), we present buildings where architectural history can be experienced three-dimensionally and live. Under the heading of “Classics’ Birthday” (starting on p. 28), we are now celebrating products that – developed decades ago – are still part of the favourite repertoire of architects and interior designers today. And because we are of the opinion that good pictures often say more than many words, we now feature the new category “Photo and Space”. In keeping with the theme of our current issue, “Sales and Presentation”, we start with a series of photographs taken by photographer Anja Schlamann (from p. 122 on) and show archaic, unorthodox shop counters. And last but not least, we are once again asking architects and interior designers to help us choose the colours that characterise the three different sections of our magazine. For the first series, we were able to win Peter Ippolito and Gunter Fleitz from the Stuttgart-based Ippolito Fleitz Group (picture on the right). Apart from that, everything is as usual: a large selection of exceptional shop fitting and retail projects, corresponding products, current news from the architectural world – all of which have been selected, researched and reported by committed architecture and interior design colleagues. We would be pleased if you like the “new” AIT as much as we do!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 05 | 2018

Issue 05 | 2018

PUBLIC BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

the social significance of education is reflected not only in the number of childcare facilities and school buildings built, but also in their interior design quality. The furnishing and equipment of learning spaces, the spatial implementation of different learning structures and the integration into the urban context reflect the degree of seriousness with which a community cares for the next generation. That this should be on the agenda of all those involved in the educational mandate seems indispensable and self-evident. As a result, not only in rural areas, but also in urban areas in particular, new buildings have been built and converted for years. Especially in growth regions, however, the need for action is still greater than ever – as are the investments apparently made available for this purpose. Let’s tackle it, one would like to call out to the German decision-makers in particular, because if we consider the multitude of high-quality educational institutions as seismographs for the corresponding social relevance, our neighbouring countries Austria and Switzerland are doing significantly better in this respect. Our selection of children’s homes, day schools, educational centres, primary and elementary schools in this issue on the subject of public buildings is proof of this (page 84). That education should accompany people throughout their lives is not a new insight. But the approach of attracting the general population with particularly striking, identity-generating buildings seems to be. When culture takes place in spaceship-like structures, former prisons, converted renaissance castles or spectacularly colourful theatres (page 122), imparting knowledge is twice as much fun. The students of the Rising Star School in Hopley, a district of Harare in Zimbabwe, now obviously have fun learning. Engineers Without Borders supported the expansion of a school complex, as vividly reported by architects Kristina Egbers and Berta Franziska Bilger (page 128). And we had a lot of fun with our cultural training in Milan on the occasion of the Salone del Mobile – as our Milan pictures show!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 12 | 2017

Issue 12 | 2017

BANKS AND AUTHORITY BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

bank buildings winning architectural awards is currently not exactly the order of the day. The situation was quite different for Bremer Landesbank (picture above and see AIT 12/16) this year: in May, the architects Caruso St John were awarded a special mention within the scope of the German Architecture Award and in October they won the “Fritz Höger Award” for brick architecture (p.14). Slowly – since the banking crisis in 2008 – the need for external representation seems to have returned to a normal level, as the sector had been noticeably reluctant to invest in prestigious buildings in recent years. And because this is the case, we have in addition to town halls, courtrooms and ministries also found numerous bank designs in Germany and abroad for our current issue on the subject of “Banks and Authorities”. Without any chrome-glass-and-granite aesthetics, these examples show how addressing customers can work today: sympathetic,
uncomplicated, transparent, and honest. Of course, security still plays a major role in this, but nowadays it is hidden in the background – without an interior design characterised by bulletproof glass and steel doors. Much more offensive is the dealing with security issues in prisons – here, however, aesthetics plays a minor role. In our article “Behind Bars” (p.118), architect and criminologist Dr. Andrea Seelich reports on the challenges of prison design. Surprising time and again, but Christmas is almost certainly just around the corner! With our selection of gifts (p.153) for and from interior designers and architects, we want to reduce your pre-Christmas “gift stress”. And as in previous years, we would also like to give a present to you: take part in our “Christmas with AIT” raffle (p.74) and win one of 85 attractive prizes – just send an e-mail stating your postal address to weihnachten@ait-online.de! In this way, we would like to thank you for your loyalty as a reader and wish you a wonderful pre-Christmas season, a merry Christmas and a brilliant start to a particularly good and successful year 2018!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 04 | 2018

Issue 04 | 2018

h3>OFFICE BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

while at the beginning of the 20th century only about three percent of all employees in Germany earned their living with a desk job, this figure has meanwhile risen to 50 percent. There are 21 million “desk activists” – although many of them no longer necessarily work at the desk. Over the past ten years, office structures have undergone fundamental change as a result of digitisation. While the enthusiasm for open space concepts has long died down, new communication technologies enable working environments that are aimed at well-being and, ideally, provide every employee with a workstation that is appropriate for the task to be solved. The fact that employees now share desks, retreat into lounge and relaxation areas or meet in teams at long conference tables has also led to a rethink in the office furniture industry – to its advantage: for the fourth year in a row, the Office and Working Environment Industry Association recorded an increase in turnover. From page 85 on, we have compiled the latest products. Interior designers and architects can also be pleased: their tailor-made office concepts are in demand among clients who want to provide unconventional, identity-generating and flexible workplaces – not least to score points in the battle for experts and knowledge workers. Author and interior designer Susanne Leson (p. 143) believes that standard solutions are a thing of the past. You will not find among the office projects we selected (p. 100). Instead, you can explore over 70 pages full of ideas and find inspiration for new working environments, small startups, large headquarters and offices incorporating art and culture. The change from an individual office to a coworking space necessitates increased demands on acoustics. Concentrated work and communication need not be mutually exclusive once appropriate measures have been taken. Our special section on office acoustics (p. 90) provides all relevant information. We will be addressing the lighting topic in the next AIT issue after returning from Light + Building with the latest products (see photos). I promise!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 11 | 2017

Issue 11 | 2017

HEALTH AND SPA

Dear Readers,

In recent weeks, I was more often strolling through exhibition halls than I could be found at my desk in the editorial department – as is the case in the autumn of every year. But, as a result, I also brought back lots of material: novelties from Habitat in Valencia and Cersaie in Bologna (photo left at the Florim stand) which we then used in the richly illustrated post-reporting for this issue of AIT. That we are apparently quite good at this has been confirmed to us by the Bologna exhibition operators since, on the occasion of the press conference on the first evening of the exhibition, they gave us a special recognition for our reporting in the form of a (tile) certificate (photo right). Whether we also succeeded this time in detecting the trends of the Italian tile industry and to present them in a readable way is up to your judgment from page 30; you will find the novelties of the Spanish furniture industry from page 36. When our AIT columnists Dominik and Benjamin Reding pondered on the idea for the theme of the current issue, the following equation forced itself on them: health + wellness = ceramics. Since reading their resulting essay “Let us embrace you, dear tiles!” (from page 56), I see nothing but tiles everywhere and, in addition, I feel I know who will win the journalism prize given by Cersaie next year! But, of course, we also looked for appropriate projects regarding the topic “Health and Wellness” and found them. Tiles play above all play a role in the water park in Offenburg designed by 4a Architekten (from page 114). In how many ways materials, surfaces and colours influence those building tasks which are particularly suitable for promoting the relaxation, recuperation and regeneration of human beings (and animals – see page 100) becomes clear in the variety of the projects selected (from page 76). Reducing fears, especially in little patients, is also the subject of the master thesis by students of the Main University of Applied Sciences (from page 48).

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 09 | 2017

Issue 09 | 2017

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Dear Readers,

no, this is not an ordinary sausage stall, which I discovered while strolling through “Markthalle Acht” in Bremen (photo on the left) – and it does not serve sausages either, but can offer a chequered history! In 1931, the oval pavilion was constructed according to plans by architect Eberhard Gildemeister (1897-1978) from Bremen, it was destroyed during the war and reconstructed in 1949 by Gildemeister’s student Lore Krajewski. Until 1999, the food stall with its red-and-white flounces offered its goods at Bremen’s main station and was – after having been stored for a few years in the Neustadt district – recently heaved into the main hall of the former Bremer Bank at the Domshof square, where it will enhance Markthalle Acht – once the initiators have finally decided upon a new use! The concept of Markthalle Acht complies with the current trend of providing identity-generating sales areas in inner-city locations for large and small suppliers of regional and high-quality products. This has proved to be an appropriate means to stand up to online trade – one could deduce from the large number of national and international retail, shop and mall concepts, which we examined for this AIT issue on “Sales and Presentation”. As it has turned out, there is no shortage of fresh ideas and innovative implementations – as illustrated by about 30 projects, which we compiled for you on more than 50 pages. Furthermore, communication designer Robin Hofmann reports on the effects and development of music in shopfitting (p. 132), while architect Valentina Kinzel explains her strategies for the contemporary design of supermarkets (p. 136). Trained in selecting projects, we are happy to contribute our experience when participating in juries. This was recently the case for the Hugo-Häring Award (Small Hugo) for the Stuttgart/Mittlerer Neckar region, where our colleague Dr. Uwe Bresan played a part (photo on the right). Until the award ceremony on 22 September at the Wilhelmspalais in Stuttgart, we maintain silence about the winners!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 07/08 | 2017

Issue 07/08 | 2017

PRIVATE LIVING

Dear Readers,

… once again we had reason to celebrate – and a good one at that: In June, we invited friends and business partners to celebrate the anniversary of our 125th AIT issue. The Stuttgart TV Tower provided the perfect setting for a fabulous party. One of the highlights of the festivities certainly was the speech by our AIT columnists Dominik and Benjamin Reding. In a special anniversary section starting on page 60, we have compiled their declaration of love to AIT, a look back on 125 years of publishing history, an overview of the numerous jubilees in 2017, an outlook on the current achievements of former AIT colleagues in their new positions as well as interior insights of 125 years of interior design and architectural history. Additionally on page 6, we introduce the people who take care that an exciting and informative AIT issue arrives at your desk fresh from the press month after month. Our photo gallery starting on page 192 presents impressions from the cheerful anniversary party (photo on the left with Michael Schmidt and Jan Theissen). To be successful on the market for 125 years a specialist magazine needs many loyal readers – like you! We therefore want to express our thanks to you – with a gift: on the occasion of our anniversary we have compiled 19 homely-culinary anecdotes of our AIT columnists in a reader entitled “Coming Home” and will post it to you if you send us your postal address at pstephan@ait-online.de. Despite the party mood, we have, of course, intensively worked on this issue focusing on the topic of “Private Homes” and discovered spectacular converted and new houses and apartments in Switzerland, France, Slovenia, Spain, Italy, Austria, and Germany. They are portrayed with their individual stories as from page 96. Uwe Bresan visited the residence of an architect from Stuttgart, which was designed by his former employees (photo at the bottom). For all readers, who are during their summer holidays travelling to the Netherlands, our article “A weekend in Rotterdam” offers numerous insider tips for interior design and architectural highlights (as from page 52). We hope you have relaxing, eventful and sunny holidays and, of course, great fun with your new holiday reading material “Coming Home”!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 10 | 2017

Issue 10 | 2017

OFFICE BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

whether textile designers occasionally get lost in the Engadine in Switzerland in search of inspiration? Who knows – but the high mountain valley in Grisons is certainly worth a visit, especially for architects, not only because of the Engadine farmhouses finished with sgraffito. In recent weeks, we AIT editors have been on the road a lot: in Pontresina (picture above), Duttweiler, Zurich (page 22), Barcelona, Olot, Pärnu (picture right), Nice, Valencia, Milan, Bologna… and we are happy to share our trouvailles – as long as they are of an interior or architectural nature – with our readers in this and the next AIT issues as well as on our Editor’s Blog on Facebook. By October at the latest, the majority of the working population has returned to the writing desks, and so is the right time for our issue on office and administration. After we have been encountering playful and colourful fun offices in our research for quite some time, where people do not only work but also eat, play and sleep, the authors Lea Hampel and Angelika Slavik answer the question of “why offices are nowadays increasingly turning into playgrounds” (page 126ff). With a certain degree of relief, we have found out that there is an increased number of architects,
interior designers and clients from Melbourne via Guangzhou to Pleidelsheim, who are approaching the topic of office environments in a technical, tidy, serious, and even luxurious way, and these are the ones we have chosen for our main project section starting on page 84. Unfortunately, only half of our readers have chosen to follow our travel tip “A Weekend in Athos” (from page 38) – which has caused considerable discussions within our predominantly female editorial staff. Only male travellers are welcome in the Orthodox monastic republic on Mount Athos. We women can only be consoled by the fact that Oliver Herwig’s article at least provides an insight into the last men’s bastion of Europe. Hopefully, the part of a car shown on the AIT cover will not be the final straw to break the camel’s back. Otherwise you have to write to me!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 06 | 2017

Issue 06 | 2017

BAR • HOTEL • RESTAURANT

Dear Readers,

although May fell far short of general expectations as regards the weather, we had two very good reasons to celebrate!
We have been nominated for “Deutscher Fachpressepreis” (German Specialist Press Award) and drank a toast to this acknowledgement on the occasion of the award ceremony at the Druckwasserwerk Restaurant in Frankfurt (photo on the right). An even more joyful event was the wedding of our AIT colleague, Christine Schröder (photo at the bottom), who tied the knot with her life companion Mehmet Urkay. Whenever we have reason to celebrate, the catering industry is involved – so it does not come as a surprise that the topic of this AIT issue – Bar Hotel Restaurant – gives us great pleasure year after year. When looking for unconventional concepts and spectacular solutions, we have found many remarkable projects. Even in case you are currently not working on a project in the catering segment and looking for corresponding inspiration, the hotels in Regensberg, Münster, Munich, Vienna, Saltaus, and Amsterdam will at least get you in the mood for a weekend trip to an environment with high-quality interior design and architecture! The same applies to restaurants and bars in Barcelona, Moscow, Rotterdam, Stuttgart, Tübingen, and Altötting. Even the Liberamensa Restaurant (page 108) in Turin is worth a detour when spending a holiday in Italy: here, architects Andrea Marcante and Adelaide Testa converted – for free (!) – the stuffy staff canteen of the penal institution into a contemporary restaurant, which is open to the public in the evenings and provides prisoners the opportunity to do an apprenticeship under professional guidance in the catering industry. The AIT test drive featured in this issue is also particularly compatible in social terms (page 56). This time, the certainly most controversial of our series actually has the misleading title of “Architecture and car”, because Jan Kliebe tested a minimalist, electrical two-wheeler, the Meijs Motorman – an adequate means of transportation for the upcoming summer!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 05 | 2017

Issue 05 | 2017

PUBLIC BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

Sitting still, as here in the Big Easy by Ron Arad at the Moroso stand, was definitely a rare occurrence during the Salone del Mobile in Milan. To get an impression of the latest international furnishing trends walking was the order of the trade fair. Our comprehensive trade fair report (starting on page 44) features the things well worth seeing; additionally you find numerous photos of our personal impressions and meetings on our Editor’s Blog on facebook. An overview of Euroluce, which takes place every two years in the context of the Salone, will be included in our June issue. Our selection of the most spectacular luminaires is supported by interior and lighting designer Heiko Gruber (photo at the bottom), who explored the Euroluce as a trend scout. In the meantime, our colleagues in the editorial office dedicated themselves to the current AIT issue: public buildings – kindergartens and schools. Changing demands on childcare facilities, education policy reforms such as all-day schools, inclusion and interdenominational schools as well as a renovation backlog built up over decades have brought professional circles to realise that half-hearted touching-up can no longer be a solution. Instead, so the association of primary schools, special demands regarding the interior design and architecture of learning and living environments in schools have to be defined: “Moving away from inflexible standard rooms and standard furniture and towards flexibly adaptable room typologies, towards a design of architecture and equipment as if made from one piece!” We happily took note of this and made it the basis for our project selection. Besides day care centres, kindergartens and schools in Germany, Austria, Great Britain, Finland, Spain, Lithuania, and China (as from page 92), we also feature a small but mighty selection of churches and cultural institutions (starting on page 122). Provided that early summer has meanwhile asserted itself: A weekend in … Leipzig (from page 60) is worthwhile! I explored it myself over the Easter holidays!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 04 | 2017

Issue 04 | 2017

OFFICE BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

the concept presented by Stuttgart-based creative agency Designplus as one of the many messages in their moveable room concept (photo on the left) on the occasion of the Euroshop trade fair in Düsseldorf could serve as a keyword for the strong trend in the office industry. When hearing “Together we are strong!” I immediately think of a merry-colourful open-plan office where countless people potter around at various workplaces. We could have filled this entire AIT issue on offices with co-working spaces – which seem to spring up like mushrooms all over the world. Don’t worry, we have selected only a few but very exceptional ones and complemented them with no less strongly designed office spaces of diverse provenance (p. 92). Besides nomadic working, which certainly has its justification, there still is the necessity of and the need for an accustomed and familiar working environment. Cologne-based interior designer Monika Lepel addressed the question of what the balancing act between the old deskfocused sedentarism and modern office nomadism can look like (p. 134) and comes to the conclusion that office rituals which are transformed into interior design can give people in offices a home. The issue of sound protection is of increasing importance in open-plan working spaces. As from page 74 we inform you about acoustic innovations and what else you can use to furnish your office interiors. Of course, we also report on Euroshop, the world’s leading retail trade fair (p. 32) and show you the most exciting presentations, which also include the trade fair stand of Designplus. We had the opportunity to collaborate with an architect and master of brand staging for many years to distinguish Germany’s best interior designers in the scope of the INsider Award every year (p. 14). Professor Klaus Schmidhuber has substantially support us as patron for eight years, and in the festive context of the INsider Award ceremony we together with many interior designers had the opportunity to express our thanks!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 03 | 2017

Issue 03 | 2017

LIVING

Dear Readers,

Procuring housing space is one of the most pressing tasks for the future of towns and municipalities. It is a well-known fact that this cannot only be done at the expense of unspoiled nature. Densification is a solution approach especially in big cities, but refurbishment, modernisation and conversion of already existing building stock are also becoming more important than ever. Besides the aspect of a sensible conservation of resources, the attraction of conversions lies in the integration of the existing building which, as a rule, leads to particularly individual solutions with a strong character and full of atmosphere. At least these were the criteria we used to select projects for our current issue on “Living”. The professional refurbishment of historic buildings with courageous and contemporary interventions, as in the apartment in Chiavari, has fascinated us just as much as the conversion of two attic levels dating from the Wilhelminian era into an incredible maisonette in Stuttgart. There we also came across the project involving a less spectacular 1950s semi-detached house, which after specific measures in the basement now provides a contemporary home for a young family. The miller’s house in Berlin and the farmhouse in Asturias had been abandoned for decades, until they were awakened from their deep slumber and are once again able to accommodate families under their new roof. As expected, the architects and interior designer specifically designed the furnishings for the respective projects, and hardly any piece of furniture is off the shelf. We are, however, happy to provide inspiration when it comes to furniture (starting on page 34), carpets (starting on page 70) or textiles (starting on page 74) – we sought out and compiled the latest trends at the trade fairs in January. And finally, some good news from our own ranks:
the management appointed our colleague Dr. Uwe Bresan deputy editor-in-chief – we share his happiness over his promotion and congratulate him!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 01/02 | 2017

Issue 01/02 | 2017

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Dear Readers,

welcome in 2017! For AIT it will definitely be a special year – we will celebrate 125 years of publishing. On 10 January 1890, Alexander Koch, founder of our publishing house of the same name, placed the magazine “Innendekoration” on the market. In 1946, after a 2-year break caused by the war, the first post-war magazine was published under the title of “Architektur und Wohnform”. When the Weinbrenner Family purchased the publishing house in 1971, the name was changed to “Architektur und Wohnwelt – Zeitschrift für Architektur, Innenarchitektur und Technischer Ausbau” and in 1980, it was finally concisely abbreviated to AIT! We will celebrate this anniversary as the year progresses – with numerous events and an anniversary issue, namely AIT 7/8.2017. A rather traumatic occurrence did not happen all too long ago: the ice-cream parlour of my childhood days used to change into a showroom for washing machines and refrigerators during the winter months. For weeks, I was seriously worried whether the showroom would change back again at the start of the ice-cream season. The both original and sensible conversion of the ice-cream parlour “Gelateria” (image on the left) on Marienplatz in Stuttgart ended much too quickly. Only until 15th February, customers who already outgrew ice-cream can enjoy cheese (and wine!) Of course, we have compiled many more successful shop design projects in this issue on “Sales and Presentation” for you. Almost 40 showrooms, supermarkets, market halls, shopping centres, stores for pet supplies, ice-cream, perfume, fashion, and glasses shall serve as a stimulating source of inspiration for your designs. Since their implementation also requires innovative materials, we once again ventured the annual trade fair marathon starting in mid-January. Heimtextil in Frankfurt was the prelude to the series, followed by Domotex in Hannover, BAU in Munich and the imm in cologne. Starting on page 68, we feature the news on floor coverings, while textile and furniture innovations will following in the March issue. We will keep you informed!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 12 | 2016

Issue 12 | 2016

BANKS AND AUTHORITY BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

with their “Afterwork workout” exhibition, the students of the PBSA (Peter Behrends School of Architecture) breathed new life into the halls of Köln Messe, where 671 companies made their contribution to modern working environments at the end of October. Their heretical thesis “The office is dead” was, of course, corrected to “… will never die!” – and this was actively demonstrated by the large number of exhibitors at the Orgatec. All the remarkable products and concepts which caught the attention of my colleagues and myself, have been compiled in our comprehensive follow-up report on the Orgatec starting on page 36. Back in our editorial office, we had to recognise that – despite intensive research for our December issue on bank and authority buildings – we had only managed to find few really outstanding bank projects. If this is down to the fact that the banking industry is occupied with scandals, legal disputes or reclaiming bonuses rather than with the planning of prestigious new buildings cannot be confirmed, it can be assumed at best. Therefore, we directed our focus on recently completed authorities – on courthouses and council buildings. Our colleague Uwe Bresan sounded out the situation in Brussels and looked around in the centre of power. The ensemble of the EU Commission Building and the EU Council Building was recently extended with the so-called Europa Building (p. 92). We also found remarkable examples in the Netherlands, Switzerland and France (starting on p. 98). That our columnists Dominik and Benjamin Reding can also make profound comments on relevant criminal topics is only a surprise for those who have not yet read their new book (p. 155) – which could be a Christmas present! Just like the recommendations on calendars, children’s books (p. 88) and all sorts of beautiful objects for (interior) architects (p. 161). As we also like to give you a present, we once again feature “Christmas with AIT” (p. 90). If you send us an email to weihnachten@ait-online.de until 16 December you will participate in the raffle. Good luck, have a relaxed Christmas and a brilliant 2017!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 11 | 2016

Issue 11 | 2016

HEALTH AND SPA

Dear Readers,

Whether in the amusing ball pit at the Biennale Interieur (left) in Kortrijk or being surrounded by the latest tile and bathroom trends at Cersaie (right) in Bologna – in recent weeks, the autumn trade fairs kept us on our toes! We are more than happy to share with you all of what my colleagues and I discovered and experienced at these trade fairs as well as at the CIFF Furniture Fair in Shanghai, at the Orgatec in Cologne and the Designers’ Saturday in Langenthal in this and the upcoming AIT issues or at our Facebook Blog. Additionally, we delved into the topic of our current issue, “Health and Wellness“, and had the chance to beam us – at least notionally – to more peaceful environments! The common denominator of all the projects featured in this issue is that they focus on the wellbeing of humans – as well as animals (page 122). One doesn’t wish anybody a visit to a medical practice or a hospital, but if it is necessary it should be as pleasant as possible – and the associated interiors should play their part. In our opinion, this has been skillfully solved by the interior designers and architects responsible for the selected projects in Manchester, Mortsel, Stuttgart, Rankweil, and Wuzhen. Fitness studios (page 104) and generous sauna
areas (page 10) as those in Berlin, Porto Alegre, Helsinki, and Biberach can play their part in preventing such unpleasant stays in healthcare facilities in the first place. The imaginative ideas are in any case suited as inspiration for a health-enhancing visit or a pending design concept! The latter is still a long way away for the freshmen who started their architecture or interior design studies in October! This year, too, we want to facilitate the first steps for the novices in our profession and send an AIT First Aid Package to all those who send their certificate of enrolment and their postal address to me (pstephan@ait-online.de). We wish all freshmen a successful start and hope that all of our readers stay healthy!

Best Wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 10 | 2016

Issue 10 | 2016

OFFICE BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

Only proven office specialists probably regard the topic of our current issue “Office and Administration” as simply THE most exciting topic! Although we deal with this topic twice a year – in the April and October issues of AIT – we are always surprised how many interesting, new and amazing aspects this building typology entails. Quite accidentally, we came across an exceptional office project by CLS Architetti on the occasion of the Salone del Mobile in Milan. Just as spontaneously, Annamaria Scevola (photo on the left), one of the partners of CLS, granted us a peek behind the scenes of a baroque church interior, which accommodates her own architectural office with 60 employees (starting in page 134) – if architects themselves act as clients, something very special will emerge. This was also the case with architectural practice Archea Brasil: the result is a raw, dark concrete-Corten steel sculpture in the middle of Sao Paulo’s street art district (starting on page 148). Whether a grey office container in Copenhagen, seemingly makeshift workplaces in a former slaughterhouse in Madrid, excitingly colourful offices in Valencia or an almost homely working atmosphere on one level of the University Centre in Cologne – these are anything but ordinary office workplaces! This is the only way how fresh ideas can emerge, as Stuttgart-based architects from Scope and their client, SAP, have learnt over the years from their fruitful collaboration and so they have developed innovative working methods (page 108). It is far from incidental that these days – namely in time for the Orgatec, the leading international trade fair for work environments in Cologne – a compilation of office essays by our AIT columnists Dominik and Benjamin Reding is published as a book with the title “All Office”. We think that the bizarre office stories by the twin brothers (photo on the right) present the allegedly dry office worlds in a completely different light and would like to share their insights with you. You can purchase the book at www.fachbuchquelle.de or through us at the AIT stand at the Orgatec from 25 to 29 October. See you there!

Best Wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 09 | 2016

Issue 09 | 2016

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Dear Readers,

those who want to sell their goods to potential customers have to come up with something special. Simply presenting what one wants to sell has not worked for a long time – storytelling is hip in our fast-paced time. Those who succeed to emotionally take the viewer along an exciting consumption trip, already have the customers on their side. A furniture manufacturer from Weil on the Rhine, who has a particular affinity for architecture, does this almost perfectly and with great consistency – you know who I mean! Recently, I had the chance to assure myself that the company’s showroom buildings by Herzog & de Meuron are perfectly suited to translate furniture stories into images, (see photo above). A visit to the “World of Malls” exhibition in the architecture museum of Technical University of Munich also served to get our colleague Regina Schubert attuned to the theme of this issue, “Sales and Presentation”. At www.facebook.com/AIT.Editors.Blog! you can find out if a visit is worthwhile. From page 92 of this AIT-issue we show you how you can use impressive stagings to not only attract customers inclined to buy but also museum and exhibition visitors. Whether cheese dairy, bakery, butcher’s shop, market hall, gin distillery, wine museum, cosmetics shop or shopping mall – every outstanding design tells an individual story, which we want to share with you. It is mostly doubted that walls can tell stories – in wallpapered form, however, this could change. With exciting patterns and innovative surfaces wallpapers seem to have awoken from a deep slumber, and we present the latest designs in our products section starting on page 76. The book “Tapetenwechsel” grants an insight into the history of the wallpaper, of which we present excerpts on pages 8, 44 and 64. And would you have thought that our cover motif is a detail of the trade fair appearance of Deutsches Tapeten-Institut (German Wallpaper Institute) at the imm-cologne 2016? We hope to have struke a chord with the choice of our cover; otherwise, simply write to me – pstephan[at]ait-online.de!

Best Wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 07/08 | 2016

Issue 07/08 | 2016

LIVING

Dear Readers,

The topic of living accommodation concerns all of us and it is more complex than most other building types. It is not for nothing that the housing crisis and flows of refugees are a core theme, which is addressed by many architects in the scope of the 15th Architecture Biennale in Venice curated by Alejandro Aravena (starting on page 10). “Reporting from the Front” was his invitation to colleagues, and 88 international architects admonished, condemned or gave impulses – the focus was predominately on the housing situation in the respective country. You still have until 27 November to visit the event, we have already been there – amongst others, in the Nordic Pavilion on the therapy sofa (photo on the left)! The residential projects we selected for this issue (starting on page 84) are certainly less suited to solve social problems. By presenting the ascetic loft and minimal spaces in Berlin, the individual homes in Jois, Turin and Melbourne as well as the exclusive residences in Stuttgart and Katowice, we rather want to offer you stimuli and ideas für highly personal and future-oriented living concepts. With our reports on residential buildings by Horace Gifford and Robert Mallet-Stevens (starting on page 126) we take a look back at the period between the 1930s and the 1970s. Would you have thought that a novel published in 1857 – “Indian Summer: A Tale” by Adalbert Stifter – has not only been on the mind of many different architects in the last 150 years, but has also influenced them? The centre of the novel is the so-called Rosenhaus and the meticulous description of its individual living spaces. Our colleague Uwe Bresan (photo on the left) has rediscovered Stifter’s novel as one of the most powerful architectural narratives of the modern age and has written a book on it in the scope of his dissertation: “Stifter’s Rosenhaus” has now been released by our publishing house. Congratulations, Dr. Bresan!! The book is perfectly suited as architectural travel literature, maybe on the way to Wolfsburg – an unexpectedly exciting city, claims our colleague, Christine Schröder (page 50). Read for yourself!!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 06 | 2016

Issue 06 | 2016

Bar Hotel Restaurant

Dear Readers,

when asking established (interior) architects in our “Job Interview” section what they would do as a young graduate today, the most common answer is: travel. Ester Bruzkus and Patrick Batek (page 12) share this opinion and add “relax”. This insight is not quite new – Goethe already thought that “a clever man finds the best education while travelling”. Today, education is not always to the fore when crowds of people embark on a journey on busses, trains and cruise ships, and they are not always brighter when they return home. Reading our current issue on “Bar Hotel Restaurant” could possibly change this. We travelled – mostly only mentally – to Buffalo, Adelaide, Tel Aviv, Mexico, Istanbul, Warsaw, London, Pamplona, Milan, Ragusa, Zurich, Basel, Adelboden, Berlin, Frankfurt, Lindau, and Hilzhofen and discovered exceptional, intelligent and imaginative projects in the catering sector, each of which would be worth a journey. From our business trip we have brought back a souvenir for you in the form of a comprehensive follow-up report on the Salone del Mobile trade fair: starting on page 32, you find the latest furniture trends from Milan! Speaking of Milan – the supposed gastronomic crochet artwork (photo on the left) is a staging at Palazzo dell´Árte on the occasion of the XXI International Triennial, which again takes place in Milan after 20 years. Under the title “21st century. Design after Design”, exhibitions and events at numerous locations on the themes of design, art, architecture, and fashion draw visitors to the North Italian metropolis until 12 September. And from Milan it is not far to Venice, where the 15th La Biennale di Venezia, the international architecture exhibition, will start on the last weekend in May. So the holiday in Italy can turn into an educational journey! Reding’s essay “Behind Glass” is about a train journey of a special kind (page 42) – but with oppressively topical references. We wish you plenty of inspiration and a relaxed summer holiday!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 05 | 2016

Issue 05 | 2016

PUBLIC BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

Public opinion is frequently divided when it comes to the question whether the seemingly elaborate equipment of a building is justified, and this issue quickly becomes a bar-room topic. This is, however, different for kindergartens, schools and cultural institutions: there has long been general agreement that each Euro spent on and every effort made for child- and education-oriented buildings is a wise investment for the future. So many buildings with an ambitious design caught our attention when doing our research on the topic of public buildings that it was difficult to make a choice. Even though the approaches are very different, the honest effort for the wellbeing of the user and the didactical task is more than apparent in all selected examples – but see for yourself from page 84 onwards. Successful projects are as good as their equipment – and that’s what our comprehensive special section on the topic of “children’s furniture” is about. In public buildings perfect lighting is indispensable. Everything also focused on luminaires at the Light + Building in March. Starting on page 32, we have composed the innovations and trends for you. Not exactly new, but more relevant than ever is the consideration on how church buildings – if they are no longer needed – can be sensibly used in the future. In our “Ideas” heading starting on page 128, we present seven profaned churches, where people no longer pray, but skate, sing, live, work, do exercises or bury the dead! We were able to visit a particularly impressive example of a church conversion in Milan, where CLS Architetti set up their architectural practice in a part of the San Paolo Converso Church. We will report on that and anything else we saw and experienced in Milan on the occasion of the Salone del Mobile (photo on the left) in our upcoming AIT issues – a foretaste of the furnishing trends is already available on our facebook page. The start into an especially varied and brimming issue is, however, marked by a sad occasion: We bow to the life’s work of the magnificent Zaha Hadid.

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 04 | 2016

Issue 04 | 2016

OFFICE

Dear Readers,

Electronic media makes office work possible at any time and in any environment. Checking mails in s street café, editing texts on the train, considering quotations on the terrace at home… Sitting down at one’s desk to “work” almost feels antiquated. Mind you, with more than 13 million office employees in Germany, this development affects more than one third of the working population – so it’s quite clear that there is disagreement as to where this will lead. While some get their trolley from the docking station to find a workplace in the non-territorial open-plan office, others appreciate their personal desk with the never changing view from the window and the child’s drawings next to the computer screen. As always, the truth lies somewhere inbetween! By means of 20 international projects starting on page 84 of this office issue we show you how differently high-quality, well-designed workplaces can be if they have been conceived by architects und interior designers. In impressive pictures, photographer Konrad Rufus Müller captured how “pale theoreticians” individually set themselves up at their personal workplace (as from page 130), while writer Sten Nadolny forges a bridge – a very entertaining one – from his first own desk to the notebook. The essay by our AIT columnist Dominik Reding starting on page 52 is about a 1960s office equipment and its mysterious originator – it’s a must read!! The demands on office workplaces have, of course, changed over the last 50 years: besides ergonomically sensible furnishing, acoustics and lighting are key factors with regard to the efficiency and wellbeing of the users. Therefore, our Product Focus Acoustics as from page 62 presents a great variety of functional and aesthetic innovations. We also informed ourselves of innovations in the field of workplace lighting at the Light & Building in Frankfurt (see photographs) – we will present them in a comprehensive special section in the AIT 5/16!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 03 | 2016

Issue 03 | 2016

LIVING

Dear Readers,

Asked about the latest living trends – as is often the case in spring after visiting a furniture fair or viewing current housing projects – one is almost tempted to say: “Do as you like!” As if it would be that easy!! No, it is definitely not randomness producing strange effects, there rather seems to prevail an unbridled lust for living, for being at home, for shaping one’s own small world. Is this down to the low interest rates, agitated world politics or the unpleasant weather? Or is a faint longing for stability, established and familiar things emerging in our digitalised world? The only thing that is new is, after all, the fact that there actually isn’t anything new! No new forms of living, no new materials, colours or shapes – instead we see strangely familiar things remixed. Will there be a post-post-modernism after the reanimation of the frequently invoked mid-centuries? Heaven forbid! On the other hand, the increased interest in living, which comes along with the pride in one’s own four walls, which is to an increasing extent reflected in sharing, posting and blogging via digital media, also has a delightful aspect! The intensive dealing with design could eventually lead to informed and demanding clients, of whom there are still too few, and with whom architects and interior designers could implement remarkable, individual housing projects. When doing research for this housing issue, we have made many such finds worldwide: whether postmodern family apartment in Greece, introverted townhouse in Sweden, soaring infill in Spain, brick residential cube in Argentina, black-and-white bungalow and mystic industrial loft in Belgium or mini apartment in Berlin – they are all far from run-of-the-mill mainstream! Since new as well as tried and tested products are advantageous for the implementation of good ideas, we show you what caught our attention at the spring trade fairs: furniture (starting on page 30), floor coverings (as from page 64) and home textiles (starting on page 72)! Enjoy the inspiration!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 01/02 | 2016

Issue 01/02 | 2016

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Dear Readers,

whether committed shop owner or manager of a shopping mall – those who put themselves and their business idea at the service of the customer would like to have a patent solution leading to the safe success of their efforts! While the three guarantors of economic success of a retail business were location, location, location, this has completely changed in the internet age! Those ordering online do not care about the location of their trading partner! Good that there are romantics for whom stationary stores are still an important contact point. 75 percent of all Germans personally purchase in a store at least once a month! This is no secret in the industry – in order to better position oneself against internet competition, many stationary retailers invest in what online trading cannot offer: in attractive store concepts that make shopping an experience. In this shopfitting issue, we have compiled best examples and stimulations for you. We have found more than 20 completed projects from Kempten to Beijing and Montreal and documented them on more than 70 pages with photographs and floor plans. We have introduced two new headings this year, which will provide additional support for the generation of ideas: under the title “Good and Beautiful” (page 60) we feature two innovative products, which are both aesthetic and sustainable. Under the headline “Ideas…” (starting
on page 114) we have collected individual wall designs in shopfitting and trade fair design for this issue. Sometimes, the success of a shopping centre must be subsequently started off. Architect Frank Dittel, who developed pop-up boxes for the “Das Gerber” shopping centre in Stuttgart, explains how this can be achieved (as from page 128). I had the opportunity to assure myself of the successful implementation on site (photo on the left). Since every good shopfitting concept needs a matching floor covering, we inform you about the latest news from the industry (starting on page 50) with current trends from the Domotex trade fair (photo at the bottom).

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 12 | 2015

Issue 12 | 2015

BANKS AND AUTHORITY BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

Sometimes, you already have to think of the projects of tomorrow and beyond and dare to take a look over the construction site fence: A regional state bank has a new building constructed at the Domshof in Bremen. After demolishing the old building, construction works behind the listed façade of the bank’s original building at the cathedral square are in full swing. Until summer 2016, a bank building will be completed here (according to the design by Zurich-based architect Caruso St John), which will enrich the historic environment between the town hall (also see page 140) and the cathedral, whilst also allowing modern banking operations. We are looking forward to see the result! If the interiors are successful, we will present them to you in AIT 12/16, our next issue focusing on bank buildings. However, we are still in the here and now – in 2015. For the last issue of this year, we have taken great pains to compile a variety of remarkable bank and authority buildings – in line with the theme of this issue – and pre-Christmassy news. Although latest political events could indeed contribute to encouraging fear and mistrust of anything foreign, we would like to use our articles “Welcome!“ (starting on page 10) and “Charity” (starting on page 24) to present projects by colleagues, which have the opposite effect and demonstrate that sensible and good things can be done in various ways. (Financial) supporters are welcome everywhere! For those lacking ideas for tangible architectural Christmas gifts we provide a remedy, too. On page 169, you find oddities and scurrilities for and from (interior) architects! Or do you prefer a travel voucher? Before you start flirting with the idea of participating in a watercolour course in Tuscany, read the declaration of love of Icelandic architect Soffia Valtýsdóttir to her home city of Reykjavik (page 60)! A perfect winter’s tale! Speaking of reading: What happened to our author Dominik Reding at the registry office is almost unbelievable – but very entertaining (page 72)! We wish you an equally enjoyable (pre-)Christmas Season and a relaxed New Year!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 11 | 2015

Issue 11 | 2015

HEALTH AND SPA

Dear Readers,

It was a new hospital building that has accompanied me through my entire architectural studies: the Katharinenhospital by Heinle Wischer und Partner in Stuttgart. The reason for this wasn’t because I had been involved in this project, but because one of our structural design professors had asked us as students in the second semester: “Watch the building site!” Since I had to walk past or around it during my studies at Stuttgart University, regardless whether I was on my way home or to the editorial office, where I was also working at that time, I couldn’t avoid seeing it! Nine years passed by between winning the competition in 1984 and the official opening in 1993 – as I recently noticed during my short visit (see the photo)! Back then I already decided that, for me, hospital projects simply take too long and that I would therefore try to avoid being involved in their planning and design! Hospitals are not everybody’s cup of tea, not only because they represent a highly complex planning task, but also because people do not really like to spend time inside them! At least in most cases – and this also applies to medical practices! Nonetheless, we dedicate a whole issue to this project type every year and diligently look for implemented results that are different. The fact that for healthcare buildings the majority of the available funds is already budgeted for the technical and medical equipment and little is left for an appealing interior design and fitout at the end doesn’t make it easier – neither for us nor for planers and patients. However, we still made several finds and have – as always – discovered some “odd” examples! Since this issue is not just about health but also about wellness, we also want to show you three really well-executed indoor swimming pools starting on page 106! From our 39th AITNewsletter@ait-online.de you have probably gathered that we are sending welcome packages with an (interior) architecture book, two AIT issues and a sketching pad to all (interior) architecture freshmen. Inform your friends, children, nephews and nieces, … and send the certificate of enrolment including your address to pstephan@ait-online.de!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 10 | 2015

Issue 10 | 2015

OFFICE BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

No, the respectable mess – on the left in the photo – is not my desk but a re-staged 1970s office scene. The photo was taken in the Emigration Centre in Bremerhaven by architect and museum operator Andreas Heller! For advocates of the paperless office it is hard to imagine that mountains of paper, files, punchers, stamps, and floral coffee mugs still characterise the appearance of many an office workspace – however, this is certainly still lived reality in many places. Modern office design does, of course, show other options and this is what our current issue on offices and administration is about. “…The ‘normal’ individual office with ‘normal’ working conditions and working hours will definitely continue to exist. Unlike for the often missionary campaigns against the individual office of the last decade, it is crucial that today’s office layouts ensure flexibility and spatial adaptability to the requirements of modern office and knowledgebased work. The requirements focus on the four areas of communication, concentration, cooperation as well as reflection/contemplation, each with different demands on room concepts and furnishings” assert Franz-Gerd Richarz and Bruno Zwingmann in their article “Office Work 4.0” in our Theory rubric (p. 146). We present exceptional office solutions from, amongst others, Cologne, Berlin, Barcelona, Lisbon, Ljubljana, Kiev, and Moscow. The next generation of students, who will start their studies in the winter term in Germany in the next few days, will also have to get used to working at a desk. Here we would like to welcome the future architects and interior designers with the words of Renzo Piano “The architect has the finest job in the world because, on a small planet where everything has already been discovered, designing is still one of the greatest adventures possible.” We are glad that you – like we did – want to take this wonderful, but also demanding professional path. Welcome to the club!!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 09 | 2015

Issue 09 | 2015

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Dear Readers,

Does the term Euclid Analytics ring a bell or has a client from the shopfitting field even confronted you with it? Firstly, I‘d like to mention that it comes from the USA and 74 percent of US citizens think it is scary. Actually, this is a very good reason to not consider it any further! However, we want you to be ready for it: “The US start-up Euclid Analytics uses the WLAN function of smartphones to observe and analyse the shopping behaviour of customers in local retail businesses. That way comprehensive statistics are created, comparable to visitor statistics of an online shop by Google Analytics,” reports “dlv–Netzwerk Ladenbau” in its latest publication. In real life, this means for the customer to be greeted by name by the shop assistant after having been identified via one’s smartphone or to receive recommendations for matching products from the digital mirrors in the changing rooms – horrible concept! The fact that so-called push messages on the smartphone inform the customer about special campaigns without one’s approval when entering the store is already state of the art. Is this really what the customer wants and needs when he actually makes the effort to go to a store instead of ordering products online? We think and hope – it’s not! That’s why we didn’t grow tired of collecting the best, most unconventional, funniest, and most inspiring shopfitting concepts for this issue we could find all over the world (starting on page 92). Since fashion items are the second most purchased goods after food, we also looked into this topic. Distributed over the whole issue, you find – marked with the ✂ symbol – contributions on architecture and fashion. It is very exciting to read what our colleagues are dealing with in this respect: with the design of shoes, catwalks, handbags, clothing, jewellery, showrooms, galleries – through to fashion photography! And since the topic of colour belongs to fashion as much as to shopfitting and trade fair construction, we have also included a special section on this topic (as from page 76), where Prof. Dr. Klaus Jan Philipp explains why white also is a (good) colour. I have yet looked at the Stuttgart Mall The Gerber (photo left), before life will be breathed into him with the new concept Gerber Upstairs (page 11) meanwhile colleague Uwe Bresan met Rem Koolhaas at the Fondazione Prada in Milan (page 120)!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 07/08 | 2015

Issue 07/08 | 2015

LIVING

Dear Readers,

the summer of 2015 will stick in our memory as a very hot one – and we will always associate it with the Expo in Milan! Almost every two weeks, another member of our editorial team visited the World Exhibition and every one of us returned with very personal impressions (for example a picture in front of the selfie-mirror in the estonian pavilion). No one had seen all of it and which pavilion was the most successful one could simply not be determined. As from page 20, we have compiled the ones, which impressed us with their architecture and/or their contents – without any claim to completeness. One thing, however, is for sure: a visit to the Expo is worthwhile! You still have the opportunity until 31 October, maybe you can think about a detour on your way to your summer holiday destination! For those who absolutely do not want to visit Italy, we have a completely different recommendation! Timisoara – the third largest city of Romania, where the Romanian revolution began in 1989, is full of architectural and interior design surprises. In his profound and entertaining contribution “A weekend in… Timisoara” (starting on page 56), Rudolf Gräf, co-founder of the Timisoara-based architectural office Vitamin A and Vice-President of the Romanian Chamber of Architects guides you through his adopted home town and illustrates how good life is in this city today. This is also the topic of our comprehensive main section (as from page 100) in our AIT issue on housing. It is out of question that living is very pleasant in the apartment in Turin, the refurbished apartment in Lisbon, the eccentric holiday home in London, the villa in Ljubljana, the stacked up loft in Stuttgart or the converted barn in Gerswald. The common feature of all of them: unusual conditions require unusual solutions and provide a plethora of stimulations for your residential projects. Good (interior) architecture is also achieved when incorporating good products – our product focus starting on page 84 highlights innovative solutions in the fields of switches and door communication systems and provides ideas for kitchen designs. The latest news from the luminaire industry – the highlights of the Lighting Fair Euroluce – can be discovered as from page 28. Interior designer Heiko Gruber visited the trade fair with us and commented on his favourite products!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 06 | 2015

Issue 06 | 2015

Bar Hotel Restaurant

Unfortunately out of print

Dear Readers,

Have I already mentioned that the AIT issue on gastronomy published every June is our favourite magazine? There is such an incredible number of imaginative, exciting and courageous concepts for restaurants, cafés, bars and hotels that it is always really difficult for us to draw up a shortlist. Nonetheless, we managed to do so once again and show you almost 40! catering businesses that could not be more different. We omitted anything mainstream and selected projects, which ooze imaginativeness and exceptional concepts: you will find everything from luxury holiday destination to peculiar cafés and trendy restaurants through to well-designed (they actually exist!) university canteens and hostels. We even present a hotel on fire, from which our columnist Benjamin Reding thankfully managed to escape! You find his exciting essay “Free Hugs” on page 70. It is an open secret that (interior) architects have a special relationship to the subject of catering, which means that they not only like to work on such projects or spend many hours in the completed ones, but occasionally one might even become a restaurateur. So it is easily comprehensible that an architect turns to the topic of wine. Although Marc Nagel from Stuttgart studied architecture, he could not be discouraged from cultivating his own vineyard and assumed the management of the vintners’ cooperative, Bad Cannstatter Weingärtner. In our heading “Change of Perspective” starting on page 54, he explains how this came about. If architects are asked what they always wanted to design, the answer often is: a hotel. Maybe you are in the fortunate position – then our report on the Milan Furniture Fair (page 24) can give you current suggestions for interior furnishings, whilst our product focus on outdoor furniture (page 74) provides latest information about furnishing products for outdoor areas. If you think we have had the opportunity to visit all the fantastic projects in Toronto, Shanghai, Mexico or Vietnam – far from it! At least we made it to Andermatt, Ostfildern-Nellingen and Stuttgart: The picture alongside was taken late at night in the Vietnamese restaurant Breitengrad 7 (page 38) in Stuttgart’s Schwabenzentrum. Our colleague Annette Weckesser travelled a little further: at the Expo in Milan she (also) took a closer look at the German Pavilion!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 05 | 2015

Issue 05 | 2015

PUBLIC BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

when architecture editors travel they cannot help but make frequent detours to architecturally interesting places and interiors! That’s easily done when visiting churches, since they are mostly open to interested visitors as, for example, the “Pfarrkirche zu unserer lieben Frau”. The most significant Gothic church building in Bamberg (image on the left) is the appropriate introduction to this issue’s topic of “Public Buildings“ – you will find more church projects in this journal. The selected kindergartens, schools, universities, art museums, theatres, and concert halls in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, Spain, Portugal, Poland and Australia also represent an impressive cross-section of current, culture communicating interiors. Hardly any other building assignment has the huge responsibility to not only provide a protecting room for the users but also create an emotionalising envelope, which perfectly supports the educational content to be conveyed. From an early age through to adulthood there is the possibility to acquire both cultural knowledge and design competence. The budget required for this purpose is, however, not always available. In our article “Klasse Schule” (page 130), we use five exemplary school buildings in Africa, Asia and Latin America to illustrate that exciting learning venues can indeed be implemented with limited means but numerous good ideas. If there are the necessary funds, one can resort to many well-designed products for the very young ones. Our main topic of “Children’s Furniture” (page 72) features many convincing examples! Salone del Mobile in Milan, on the contrary, offered countless stimulations for design-oriented adults last April. After the cold of the Easter holidays, the bright sunshine in Italy’s design capital provided exactly the right ambience for a visit to the trade fair during the
day and inspiring events in the nearby showrooms of renowned manufactures in the evening. Long days and short nights was the motto for all media representatives, but in return, my colleague Uwe Bresan and I (image at the bottom) have found many new solutions and exciting news regarding furniture and luminaire design. After careful selection, we will show the highlights in the next AIT issue, which will be published in early June. For now, we wish you an enjoyable read of the current May issue!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 04 | 2015

Issue 04 | 2015

OFFICE BUILDINGS

Dear Readers,

Right now you are probably where 18 million Germans spend a majority of their lifetime – in your office! As many people as never before – about one quarter of the total population – practise a job between computer screen, desk and swivel chair. Depending on the range of duties, this job is more or less inspiring, specified in varying degrees or simply functional. In many offices you can see what is happening inside: whether the user is doing administrative work, develops ideas or exercises power! For this office issue, our AIT columnists, Dominik and Benjamin Reding, visited eight influential office users and took a curious look at their working environment. The workplaces of politician Claudia Roth, Bishop Markus Dröge, entrepreneur Christian Boros, Foundation President Hermann Parzinger, artistic director Dagmar Reim, editor-in-chief Lorenz Maroldt, theatre maker Friedrich Barner and ambassador Tim Guldimann could hardly be any more different. Under the title of “How power works.” You can expect an – as always brilliantly and hilariously worded – insight into these personal control centres! Claudia Roth is already looking forward to the publication, her press office informed us! Another person who can be delighted is AIT reader Dr. Konstantin Knecht, architect from Stuttgart and participant in our contest related to the Reding essay in AIT 1-2/15 (p. 60). His vote for the housing scenario of bookkeeper Peter K. described by Benjamin Reding was drawn from numerous entries, and in the next few days, Dr. Knecht will receive an original issue of “Innen-Dekoration” dating from Mai 1930 by post! In this issue, we can also announce another competition result in our own account: every year we ask our readers which AIT cover they liked best – no, it´s not the AIT-issue, which ambassador Tim Guldimann (see photograph below) browsed through! On page 14 you can find out which one it is and if you have, participation provided, won one of numerous architectural book prizes. In case you also want to know, which wall colour (photo on the left) has inspired and motivated me for the last 13 years at my workplace – it is Rouge Rubis by Polychromie Le Corbusier – and it still does! Good work!

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 03 | 2015

Issue 03 | 2015

RETAIL AND PRESENTATION

Unfortunately out of print

Dear Readers,

Hardly a day goes by without the local press having to bewail the closing down of a retail store – major cities as well as small towns are affected by the decline in stores. As a rule, online trading and large-scale shopping malls are held responsible for this. Nonetheless, the German Retail Association (Handels-verband Deutsch¬land – HDE) instilled a little sense of optimism amongst its members earlier this year: at the press conference on 30th January, HDE Chief Executive Office Stefan Genth forecasted an increase in turnover of 1.5 percent for 2015 and thus “…a slight growth in sales in the German retail sector for the sixth consecutive year.” However, inner-city locations are still on a drip-feed. According to a survey conducted by the Institute for Retail Research (Institut für Handelsforschung) in Cologne, meanwhile every fifth consumer buys less in city centres. The frequently invoked shop hours shall do the trick. Federal states and municipalities were required to make use of legal latitudes, HDE demanded. Those retailers who do not want to wait for such action do well to analyse their customer structure and work out new concepts. Here, architects and interior designers can help and effectively turn fresh ideas into attractive shopping experiences. We have chosen several inspiring examples from countless implemented shopfitting projects all over the world and present them to you in this shopfitting issue. Patisseries, boutiques, flagship stores, malls, market halls or shopping centres – in Belo Horizonte, Montreal, New York, Istanbul, Mallorca, Munich, Frankfurt or Stutt¬gart – they are all distinguished by a high level of design quality and an intelligent concept. Perfect examples and most warmly recommended as an interesting read: Shopping City in Bad Münstereifel (page 130) and the Open Space Project in Cologne (from page 138 onwards). What our columnists, the Reding Brothers, came up with on the topic of shopping page 64), is – as always – not only very entertaining, it is movingly real.

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract
Issue 01/02 | 2015

Issue 01/02 | 2015

LIVING

Unfortunately out of print

Dear Readers,

have you also told yourself to take it a little easier in the New Year? In the first weeks we already had to lower our sights in this respect and have managed a real trade fair hopping between Frankfurt, Hanover, Cologne, and Munich! Before that we already raised our glasses on the 125th anniversary of our foundation. On 10 January 1890, Alexander Koch, the founder of our publishing house of the same name, brought the first issue of ‘Innen-Dekoration’, the forerunner of AIT, to the market. The guide on home furnishing quickly evolved into a guideline for all questions of taste and style in modern life. In subsequent years, Koch committed himself as a successful publisher and exhibition organiser, and in 1898 he laid the foundation for the construction of the
famous artists’ colony at the Mathildenhöhe in Darmstadt. Until his death in 1939, Alexander Koch was to be found wherever the new time presented itself in a new form. The first post-war issue – after a two years time-out due to the war – was published in 1946 under the tile “Architektur und Wohnform”. Koch’s son, Alexander Koch junior, not only adapted the title, he also adapted the content to the requirements of the postwar period: the reports focused on cost-efficient small houses and their furni shing. Thanks to numerous contributions by foreign correspondents, the journal soon lived up to the successes of the pre-war period. In 1971, the title “Architektur und Wohnform” was changed to “Architektur und Wohnwelt“ when the publishing house was sold to the Weinbrenner Family. The subtitle “Zeitschrift für Architektur, Innen architektur und Technischer Ausbau” finally became the current title “AIT” in 1980! And still today we do report – as in this issue – on remarkable small and large residen ces from Germany and abroad however expanded the range of topics from home interiors to current building tasks such as offices, shopfitting and trade fair construction, public buildings, restaurants, healthcare buildings as well as banks and authorities. After 123 years of appearance fresher and more topical than ever! This is verified by numerous awards and a large and loyal readership! This will continue to be our obligation and incentive in the future – we already work on specials for the 125th anniversary of foundation.

Best wishes
Petra Stephan, Dipl.-Ing.
Chief Editor
Architect

Extract